CAP Outlines 2019 Priorities

With the 2018 General Election behind us, Citizens Above Partisanship has outlined its priorities for 2019. In keeping with our mission to promote cooperative politics for the benefit of all Washington County residents, we have identified three main priorities for this year. These priorities all support our core value of ethics, education and the economy.

Priority 1: Diversity Among Local Elected Officials

One of CAP’s long-term priorities is to improve diversity among local elected officials. CAP endeavors to ensure that not only the most ethical and most qualified individuals serve in office, but also that elected officials are as diverse as the residents of the county. We will address this priority in 2019 by reaching out to members of traditionally underrepresented groups to identify issues of concern to those communities & how they fit in with CAP priorities. We will publicize and address those issues via speakers and topics at our meetings, social media outreach, and outreach at local meetings and events. Our intent is to be in a position to encourage and support a diverse and qualified pool of candidates for the 2020 election and beyond.

Priority 2: Ethics and Transparency in Local Government

A continuing CAP priority is to raise the ethical standards and transparency of local government. We strive for a culture of inclusion, competency, and trust. We must ensure that our elected officials treat everyone fairly and without bias and that there are clearly stated and enforced policies regarding ethics. We are concerned about the number of closed meetings and the lack of public review of some decisions, and in 2019 we will attend County Commissioner meetings, Board of Education meetings, and other municipal meetings to ensure that these issues are being tracked and the public made aware of them.

Priority 3: Economic Development and Education

Our third major priority for 2019 is to raise awareness of economic and educational issues in the county. A strong economy is crucial for any healthy, thriving community, as is an educated electorate. A community with low unemployment whose citizens are employed in quality jobs has lower rates of crime and illegal drug use. Education is closely tied to both economic success and a healthy, thriving community. In 2019 we will connect with local business and educational leaders about both the challenges they face and about positive trends, and bring those things to a larger audience through our meetings and our outreach efforts.

Democracy takes work. Let’s get to work.

Kickoff Celebrates Political Cooperation

Citizens Above Partisanship’s extremely successful Meet the Candidates Kickoff party at Bulls & Bears on Thursday, May 10 was concrete evidence that Washington County is ready for cooperative, nonpartisan government. The event was attended by four of the five candidates CAP is endorsing in the 2018 election and by more than 50 community members and supporters. Attendees enjoyed food, drink, and animated conversation about the future of Washington County. Overheard were discussions of education funding, tax policy, and economic development, as well as spirited debate about candidates for statewide office. These conversations were certainly energetic, but they were also mutually respectful, with an eye toward how to best serve the common good.

Each candidate addressed the crowd briefly, talking about their support for CAP’s mission of nonpartisan cooperation and about their individual campaign objectives. John Krowka, candidate for Board of Education, led off by talking about smart school spending, career readiness that doesn’t always involve a college degree, the need for community engagement, and the fact that “one size does not fit all” in education.

The crowd then heard from the candidates CAP is endorsing for County Commissioner. These candidates span the political spectrum, but while they spoke from different perspectives they voiced similar concerns. Donna Brightman asked the crowd to redirect the frustration they might be feeling about politics at the national level into meaningful action at the local level. Scott Bryan emphasized the importance of mutual trust between a community and its leaders. Cort Meinelschmidt talked about the need for a budget that meets the needs of all citizens, and praised Krowka for his emphasis on education that serves all students. Although Elizabeth Paul was unable to be at the Kickoff, a campaign representative spoke on her behalf about her commitment to ethical leadership and responsible governance.

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The breadth of support for CAP’s mission was further evident in the wide range of donations to the silent auction that took place at the Kickoff. From Fountain Head Country Club to Talon Studio Tattoo and with many, many others in between, small businesses all over the county clearly understand the necessity of cooperative government in Washington County. Other business donors included:

CAP is deeply grateful to all these businesses, as well as to the individual artists and collectors who also donated to the auction, and of course to everyone who came out to the Kickoff to support our candidates and our mission. Democracy takes work. It’s good to know that we can have fun at the same time!

 

Washington County’s Ethics Fail

It was with disappointment, if not surprise, that we read the findings of the county Ethics Commission released late last week.

Where to begin? With the leaking of a document clearly classified as confidential by the county’s own Harassment Policy? With the decision that said leak was not unethical because it was not for “private gain,” a caveat that is nowhere mentioned in the policy itself? Perhaps with the twin decision that misleading the public by selectively leaking incomplete information is also perfectly ethical, for the same reason. Maybe we should begin with the county’s Ethics Ordinance, which deals almost exclusively with financial disclosure. Or with the murky Ethics Commission itself, appointed by the very commissioners it was charged to investigate. Apparently the entirety of Washington County government believes that nothing is unethical unless it leads to personal financial gain. As they say, foll­­­­­ow the money.

In any case, clearly nobody wants to begin where it actually began, with the allegations of gross misconduct brought against Commissioner LeRoy Myers. Oh, a powerful man made unwanted sexual advances toward a subordinate woman? Yawn. Nothing unethical about that.

Aristotle conceived of ethical behavior as the “good action” which is necessary for living a virtuous life. Ethical judgements are complex. We get that. Nevertheless, by any measure save their own, the Board of County Commissioners is an ethical failure.

Citizens Above Partisanship’s statement of priorities calls ethical considerations “the highest, philosophical level of our democracy;” the one that guides all our other priorities. “Ethics are a manifestation of our common values and our commitment to shared humanity,” the statement goes on. The necessity of doing the difficult, messy work of making local government reflect those values and commitment has never been more evident.

We call on the Board of County Commissioners to establish a robust, confidential reporting structure for ethics violations and a meaningfully independent Ethics Commission to handle such reports. If the current Board is unable or unwilling to do so, then we call on them to step aside for candidates who will. Good government presupposes selfless commitment to a common good. If our current commissioners cannot concretely demonstrate that they have that commitment, then we will elect commissioners who can.